Friday, April 22, 2011

THE ANATOMY OF A PAINTING!

In the beginning, I covered a failed painting with collage papers.  I rather liked the result as an abstract but forged on.  After various studies, I decided on this composition.  It was originally a rectangle but thought it would work in a square format.  I transferred my drawing with a blue watercolor crayon and then applied acrylic ink with a stick for the line drawing.

By photographing the image I was able to put it into my iPad and upload it into a painting program.  Now I can play around with color and value patterns to try some ideas out.  This stage was lots of fun.

This is how far I got today. I am very happy with some parts....the figure on the right is just the balance of line and texture, value and finish that I wanted.  The figure on the left I am not happy with her forehead...too large but the degree of finish, value and color are satisfactory.  The middle figure is where I wanted the focal point.  She is too opaque and more finished than I wanted, although I think she is well painted.  This is the difficult stage.  I have to make a decision whether to try to make some changes that may ruin the painting or let it be even though I am not totally happy with it.

I wanted to check the value pattern, so I put the photo of the painting into Photoshop Elements and changed it to black and white.


                           Not enough contrast, so I pushed it farther.  


I think the middle figure should be lighter to create a stronger focal point.  By selecting that area, I could change the value in the activated area while leaving the rest alone.  Making it lighter did the trick.


 Now the value pattern is working for me.  I have an idea how to make these changes.  What would you do?

9 comments:

jill said...

wow todays blogs feel like a real life art class to me today, I love the people you draw and have always wanted to draw older people as I love their lines and shape. Your work is stunning thankyou for sharing your process. I particularly like the colour ones

AutumnLeaves said...

Myrna, I am so glad I found your blog. I love how you celebrate the elderly. I'm amongst that group now myself...or pretty darned close. You show the beauty of these men and women and that is priceless. I wouldn't have noticed the forehead of the lady on the left myself, until you mentioned it. I could be wrong, but I don't think it is too large as much; maybe just protruding too far over her eyes, if that makes sense. I think it is a glorious piece and I wish I could hear their conversation!

carol said...

I would crop out about 35% of the bottom of the painting and make it a long thin painting. Not sure why --- maybe I just don't find the bottom of the painting interesting. I love the faces and hands.

That's my two cents.

wandamarie said...

Wow, yet another reason I'd love to have an IPad! This really helps the creative process. Wonderful!

One Woman's Thoughts said...

I really like this and appreciate the way you show us the how and whys of your work. I learn something so often from you.

Pandora's Cottage said...

Not sure what I would do - but I'm loving what you did! Thanks for sharing, you've inspired me.....
Susan

david m mc cully said...

myra, i am uncomfortable with the several hands in this picture, one shows only a "heel" and the eye stops on it, would it be helpful to put aglove on one of the two in the foreground? Too much crinkly skin, takes away from the faces. dave mccully

RH Carpenter said...

In the color versions, my eyes were drawn more to the hands - all those fingernails and hands in various positions - a gracefulness for each woman all her own. I enjoyed the lesson you gave us on your process with this one very much - you are a natural born teacher. Lovely painting of lovely older women who are often overlooked. We are all getting there (if we're lucky enough to live that long).

Myrna Wacknov said...

Thank you all for your comments. It helps to get feedback and I appreciate when you share what you feel is not working as well as what you like. Each of us, as artists, need to evaluate each comment and then agree or disagree.

Related Posts with Thumbnails